Amazing Class

May 27th, 2010

I didn’t expect this class to turn out as it did. But I don’t have any real complaints about this class. I learned a lot; about PIE paragraphs, globalization, my own childhood. It was difficult to transition from my high school writing into college writing. But this will help me through my college career and beyond. I am thankful for that. The discussions we held in class were interesting, I learned a lot about other peoples opinions and ideas. Learning about other peoples childhoods didn’t make me feel alienated or what not ;on the contrary majority of the students had childhoods similar to mine. None of my other classes have class dissusions like this. Falling down the stairs was the worst part of it all. BTW, it’s still bruised but NOT SWOLLEN thankfully and will heal soon I hope. ( I’ve been avoiding flip flops.)

I did not find any difficulty in the work, but some parts of the courses (ie: PIE Paragraph) was hard to deal with. The professor was clear and consistent and always asked if we had any difficulties with our papers. He gave examples that were helpful to us and showed us what he expected from our papers.

Professor Alvarez, you are a wonderful teacher and you do not deserve to be an adjunct professor. Hopefully after you graduate Graduate School you will consider being a English Professor full time.

OH YEA.

May 22nd, 2010

IM FINISHED. YEA. PULLED IT THROUGH. HELL YEA.

now off to work.

FML.

Fin: Scholarship Essay

May 22nd, 2010

Lisa Lu

Professor Steven Alvarez

English 110

22 May, 2010

Educating the young: A scholarship statement

My interest in teaching first started back when I was younger. My third grade teacher asked the class, what we wanted to do when we grew up. I wrote down, I want to an educator.

It was not until I started my undergraduate studies, I became exposed to a number of liberal studies courses, which allowed me to pursue my passion for education. I’ve also had the opportunity to take a psychology class by Professor Malkuz, some of her lectures allowed me to broaden my knowledge of cognitive development.

In the world of education, I have developed a special interest in teaching elementary school children. This summer I have applied and interviewed by a number of private schools to be an assistant teacher. Next summer, I plan to apply for a job teaching English as a second language abroad. Many parents of the children I have baby sat during my high school years, says, that I am very capable, determined and patient with children. They say I have the qualities of an educator.

After graduating from Queens College with a degree in elementary education; I plan to apply to Columbia School of Teaching for my graduate degree. After I earn my masters I plan to gain more experience by actually teaching in public schools. I intend to go back to school for my PhD in psychology. I plan to major in childhood development. I hope that learning more about childhood development will give me more edge with different students.

You should consider me as a candidate for Esther’s Book fund because I possess the leadership quality and persona for being a teacher. My experiences lead me to grow more passionate about educating the younger generation. Since I am fully devoted into becoming an educator, I need money to supply my needs. I  hope you will provide me with what I need to continue my studies at Queens College.

Fin: Essay 1: Childhood Essay

May 22nd, 2010

Lisa Lu

Professor Steven Alvarez

English 110

22 May, 2010

Natural Growth, A Method for Child Rearing: A Response to Annette Lareau’s Unequal Childhoods with My own childhood.

When reading Unequal Childhood, one begins to understand a professional perspective of how parent’s child rearing strategies develop. The two most common types of child rearing strategies are “Accomplishment of Natural Growth” and “Concerted Cultivation”. The accomplishment of natural growth is a child rearing strategy that is more commonly developed within working lower-class families. It encompasses the “natural growth” of a child. Parents who commonly use this strategy will allow their child to grow as they please, within a restricted set of boundaries. The term “sense of constraint” is commonly used along side is phrase, a child is in a sense of constraint when he or she is limited by boundaries and accepts the dominate authority. Concerted Cultivation is a strategy most commonly used by middle class families. They encompass the term “sense of entitlement”, children who develop a sense of entitlement display more authority towards institutional figures.  In this essay, I will explain further of the term “Accomplishment of Natural Growth” and its related terms.

Every parent’s dream to have their child grows up well and healthy, ready for society. Parents raise its child with great difficulty. Especially when there can be other factors that contributes in raising children. Children born into working class and lower class families have it tougher than other children with intuitional advantages. Lareau says:

They do not seem to view children’s leisure time as their responsibility; nor did they see themselves as responsible for assertively intervening in their children’s school experiences. Rather, the working class and poor parents carried out their chores, drew boundaries and restrictions around their children, and then within these limits, allow their children to carry out their lives. It is in this sense that I use the term “the accomplishment of natural growth”. (Lareau, 289)

Most working class and lower class parents raise their children in the sense of natural growth. They allow their children to grow themselves, while giving them a set of boundaries to follow. My parents both had jobs. I have two siblings also both younger than me. Growing up, my mom told me the dangers of what a child cannot do, like open the stove, cook, light a fire, answer the door, go outside without permission and play with friends outside without permission. As long as I did not do any of those things I would not get into trouble. Most of the time, I stayed home watching my younger siblings. Even until now, I care for my siblings like a second mother. My parents child rearing strategies can be compared to Lareau’s concept of natural growth.

I learned at a young age that we did not have money to burn. At the age of ten, I went through a phase where I wanted to learn piano. Even though my parents promised me that they would get me lessons soon; I knew that they hid something from me. My working class parents had already enough trouble raising three kids. Lareau mentions:

Formidable economic constraints make it a major like task for these parents to put food on the table, arrange for housing, negotiate unsafe neighborhoods, take children to the doctor (often waiting for city buses that do not come), clean children’s clothes, and get children to bed and have them ready for school the next morning. (3)

With no spare money lying around, I would consider twice before asking for something. In the fourth grade I really wanted to learn how to play piano. I wanted to learn because all my cousins knew how to play an instrument and my siblings and I did not. My extended family understands how we live, and sometimes they try to help by offering to take us to amusement parks or movies. My cousin, who lives in a middle class lifestyle, knows how to play the piano; she also takes art classes and learns Chinese on Saturdays. With great restraint I try not to say “How come Annie has piano classes and I do not?” My parents always tried to make life better for us (even though I did not see them much), like getting us up for school, doing our laundry, and getting us ready for bed at night. My mom stressed that her most important duty was raise us well and send us off to college. Economic constraints inhibit the ability to develop skills useful in real life.

Neither of my parents graduated from high school, neither of them hold GEDs. Both my parents came to the United States to make a better living. They did not understand English, making it difficult to participate in anything with English involved. English as a second language made it difficulty communicating with authorities because of the language barrier. This clearly shows an emerging sense of constraint through my parents as well. Lareau mentions:

The working class and poor children, by contrast, showed an emerging sense of constraint in their interactions in institutional settings. They were less likely to try to customize interactions to suit their own preferences. Like their parents, the children accepted the actions of persons in authority (although at times they also covertly resisted them). Working class and poor parents sometimes were not as aware of their children’s school situation (as when their children were not doing homework). Other times, they dismissed the school rules as unreasonable. (6)

My parents worked extremely hard and they come home from work exhausted but still have more work to do, getting three kids to sleep. As an older sibling, I feel obligated to prepare my siblings for sleep first before I start my homework or study for an exam. Frequently, I compromised my studies for the well-being of my siblings. My parents would meet with my teacher and my teacher said that I lacked homework efficiency. My parents explained their situation and I tried to translate for them. Despite the circumstances he stressed the importance of homework. Even though my teacher understood, my parents still believed that taking care of my siblings is more important than studies.  Yet my parents could no argue with the teacher because of intimidation. Instead they meekly said that they would make more of an effort in checking their homework. Even in thus example one can comprehend a sense of constraint as the lack of knowledge of dealing with authorities makes it difficult for them. Also my parents find it pointless to argue with an educator because they do not have the conversational skills of other parents who have experience with institutions. My mom explained that she did not have the experience to talk to a person a “that way” like I talk to her. (Pang) She mentioned that she “did not know how” (Pang), therefore restrained her from talking to the teacher in a certain manner.

When families gather at family reunions, it happens that children are naturally obligated to take care of younger children. Although parents often do not ask them to, older children often take care of the younger children anyways. It is because children from the working class have an instant access to their extended family, therefore cousins, aunts, and uncles are a close part of the child’s life.

Annette Lareau explains further: “At these and other family events, older children voluntarily play with and take care of their younger siblings and cousins while adults mingle and talk among themselves” (141).

Children growing up in a natural growth environment do not have as packed schedule as children raised in concerted cultivation environments. In my younger years, my aunt and uncles often held family parties, where all the extended families in the area visited their houses. All the families that visited had children of their own, so I had many cousins. Although my parents did not tell me to take care of my baby cousin, I felt obligated to take care of her while my aunt was busy. Taking care of my baby cousin turned out not bothersome at all, in fact I quite enjoyed it. As I am one of the older children, I feel obligated to make sure the children do not get into any trouble. All my cousins, whom I have played with since I was a toddler, are like my siblings. I treat my aunts and uncles like my mom and dad.  These extended relatives have formed very close bonds in my life, so I do not mind taking care of them. My mom often mentioned to her friends how much I like taking care of kids. She says “it is good experience learning how to take care of kids.” (Pang)

While growing up in an immigrant Chinese family, respecting adults is a decorum that my siblings and I followed. We would be disciplined if we disrespected an adult. I have acknowledged this rule since I had diapers on. Even now, I dare not to act surly to adults. It is the utmost importance to respect adults. Lareau mentions: “She places a premiums respect on for adults. All adults, whether they are related to Tyrec or not, receive automatic respect and deference from the children” (71).

As the eldest of three siblings, I am required to lead an example to my brother and sister. In Chinese culture to act rude to adults shows a sign of disrespect and rudeness. It also casts bad luck upon ones family. My parents taught me, if one acts rude to adults, it would show that parents cannot be good caretakers. It also shows that my siblings and I act entitled. Acting “respectful” comes with a price. When accused wrongly of something I did not do, I did not have the courage to stand up for myself. This is something Lareau also mentions in her book Unequal Childhoods. In this situation I did not have the experience or the courage to talk back. My mom always said that “Adults should be treated with respect. We will be looked down on if my kids did not know how to act in front of an adult.” (Pang) My grandparents taught my mom how to treat adults with respect and she taught us the same lesson.

Siblings in lower and working class families tend to establish closer relationships than siblings in the middle class. Sibling rivalry will always exist, but it does not occur as often in the working and lower class families. In working and lower-class families Lareau sees that siblings develop relationships more deeply than working-class families. They also get along better as a family than middle-class families. She gives the example of working class siblings Tyrec and Anisha.

Tyrec’s sister and to a lesser extent his older brother are important part of his life. Although Anisha can be bossy at times, she and Tyrec are close companions. They help each other out, providing mutual support when, for example, their mother is in a bad mood. They spend time together both inside and outside. They often watch television together or play video games together. (76)

Here Lareau clearly states a close bond between siblings in a working-class family. Since their schedules involve a lot of free time, they have more time to spend it together. My siblings and I can be considered very close companions. Although we do fight, I find it not as often as in comparison to my aunt’s three children. Since our schedules did not fill up with activities or team sports, we spent our time together talking and playing. I remember this Sunday afternoon, my siblings and I had finished our homework and with nothing to do, I decided to make a car out of cardboard. In a group effort we finished the car beautifully only thrown out into the dumpster in the end. Although the product was wasted, the development of the sibling relationship symbolically considered the most important. I believe close sibling relationships can help keep familial bonds close as children get older. Without family support it impacts children lives greatly. Children without parents or homes often emerge without a sense of entitlement or constraint. Often they become lost due to no one guiding them.

My parents reared me to be a natural growth child. I do not have any regrets about being a child raised by natural growth. My parents simply did not have the resources nor the time to raise my siblings and I as an concerted cultivated child. Overall the experience was positive for me, however in the future I would mentally note how concerted cultivated children have more of a sense of entitlement and rear my children towards being entitled.

Works Cited

Lareau, Annette. Unequal Childhoods: Class, Race, and Family Life. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2003.

Pang, Karen. Personal Interview. 22 April. 2010.

draft 2 of Childhood essay

May 22nd, 2010

Lisa Lu
Professor Steven Alvarez
English 110
06 April, 2010
Natural Growth, A Method for Child Rearing: A Response to Annette Lareau’s Unequal Childhoods with my own childhood.
Every parent’s dream to have their child grows up well and healthy, ready for society. Parents raise its child with great difficulty. Especially when there can be other factors that contributes in raising children. Children born into working class and lower class families have it tougher than other children with intuitional advantages. Lareau says:

They do not seem to view children’s leisure time as their responsibility; nor did they see themselves as responsible for assertively intervening in their children’s school experiences. Rather, the working class and poor parents carried out their chores, drew boundaries and restrictions around their children, and then within these limits, allow their children to carry out their lives. It is in this sense that I use the term “the accomplishment of natural growth”. (Lareau,289)

Most working class and lower class parents raise their child in the sense of natural growth:. They allow the child to grow themselves while giving them a set of boundaries to follow. My parents both had jobs. I have two siblings also both younger than me. Growing up, my mom told me the dangers of what a child cannot do, like open the stove, cook, light a fire, answer the door, go outside without permission and play with friends outside without permission. As long as I did not do any of those things I would not get into trouble. Most of the time, I stayed home watching my younger siblings. Even till now, I care for my siblings like a second mother. My parents child rearing strategies can be compared to Lareau’s concept of natural growth.
I learned at a young age that we did not have money to burn. Even though my poarents tried to hide it, money was an issue. At the age of ten, I went though a phase where I wanted to learn piano. Even though my parents oromised me that they would get me lessons soon; I knew that they hid something from me. My working class parents had already enough trouble raising three kids. Lareau mentions:

Formidable economic constraints make it a major like task for these parents to put food on the table, arrange for housing, negotiate unsafe neighborhoods, take children to the doctor (often waiting for city buses that do not come), clean children’s clothes, and get children to bed and have them ready for school the next morning. (3)

With no spare money lying around, I consider twice before asking something. In the fourth grade I really wanted to learn how to play piano. I wanted to learn because all my cousins knew how to play an instrument and my siblings and I did not. My extended family understands how we live and sometimes they try to help by offering to take us to amusement parks or movies. My cousin, who lives in middle class lifestyle, knows how to play the piano; she also takes art classes and learns Chinese on Saturdays. With great restraint I try not to say “How come Annie has piano classes and I do not?”My parents always tried to make life better for us (even though I did not see them much), like getting us up for school, doing our laundry, and getting us ready for bed at night. There was this one night I pestered my parents to o on a field trip, I did not realize how tired they were but all of a sudden my mom snapped at me and told me to go to bed. Economic constraints inhibit the ability to develop skills useful in real life.

Neither of my parents graduated from high school, neither of the hold GEDs. Both my parents came to the United States to make a better living. They did not understand English making it difficult to participate in anything with English involved. English as a second language made it difficulty communicating with authorities because of the language barrier. This clearly shows an emerging sense of constraint through parents as well. Lareau mentions:

The working class and poor children, by contrast, showed an emerging sense of constraint in their interactions in institutional settings. They were less likely to try to customize interactions to suit their own preferences. Like their parents, the children accepted the actions of persons in authority (although at times they also covertly resisted them). Working class and poor parents sometimes were not as aware of their children’s school situation (as when their children were not doing homework). Other times, they dismissed the school rules as unreasonable. (6)

My parents worked extremely hard and they come home from work exhausted but still have to get three kids to sleep. As an older sibling, I feel obligated to prepare my siblings for sleep first before I start on my homework or study for an exam. Frequently, I compromised my studies for the well being of my siblings. My parents would meet with my teacher and my teacher said that I lacked homework efficiency. My parents explained their situation and I tried to translate for them. Despite the circumstances he stressed the importance of homework. Even though my teacher understood, my parents still believed that taking care of my siblings is more important than studies. My parents could no argue with the teacher because of the intimidation that the teacher gave off. Instead they meekly said that they would make more of an effort in checking their homework. Even in thus example one can sense that there is an emerging sense of constraint with the parents. The lack of knowledge of dealing with authorities makes it difficult. Also my parents find it pointless to argue with an educator.
When families gather at family reunions, it happens that children are naturally obligated to take care of younger children. Although parents often do not ask them to, older children often take care of the younger children anyways. It is because children from the working class have an instant access to their extended family, therefore cousins, aunts, and uncles are a close part of the child’s life. Annette Lareau explains further:

At these and other family events, older children voluntarily play with and take care of their younger siblings and cousins while adults mingle and talk among themselves. (141)

Children growing up in a natural growth environment do not have a packed schedule as a child raised in a concerted cultivated environment. In my younger years, my aunt and uncles often held family parties, where all the extended families in the area visited their house. All the families that visited had children of their own, so I had many cousins. Although my parents did not tell me to take care of my baby cousin, I felt obligated to take care of her while my aunt was busy. Taking care of my baby cousin turned out not bothersome at all, in fact I quite enjoyed it. As I am one of the older children, I feel obligated to make sure the children do not get into any trouble. In some situations where my aunt does as for my help because she has her hands full. All my cousins, whom I have played with since I was a toddler, are like my siblings. I treat my aunts and uncles like my mom and dad. These extended relatives are all very close in my life, so I do not mind taking care of them.
While growing up in an immigrant Chinese family, respecting adults is a decorum that my siblings and I followed. If we were ever to disrespect an adult we would be disciplined. I have been following this rule since I was a toddler. Even now, I dare not to act surly to adults. It is the utmost importance to respect adults. Lareau mentions:

She places a premiums respect on for adults. All adults, whether they are related to Tyrec or not, receive automatic respect and deference from the children. (71)

As the oldest out of three siblings, the importance of leading an example to my brother and sister is vital. In Chinese culture acting rude to adults is extremely rude and disrespectful. It also casts bad luck upon your family. My parents taught me, if you act rude to adults, it would show that my parents cannot be good caretakers. It also shows that my siblings and I act spoiled. Although there are some unfortunate circumstances that comes with acting “respectful.” When accused wrongly of something I did not do, I did not have the courage to stand up for myself. This is something Lareau also mentions in her book Unequal Childhoods. In this situation I did not have the experience or the courage to talk back.
Siblings in lower and working class families tend to establish closer relationships than siblings in the middle class. There will always be a form of sibling rivalry, but it does not occur as often in the working and lower class families. In working and lower class families Lareau sees that sibilings develop relationships more deeply than working class families. They also get along better as a family than middle class families.
Tyrec’s sister and to a lesser extent his older brother are important part of his life. Although Anisha can be bossy at times, she and Tyrec are close companions. They help each other out, providing mutual support when, for example, their mother is in a bad mood. They spend time together both inside and outside. They often watch television together or play video games together. (76)
Here Lareau clearly states a close bond between siblings in a working class family. Since their schedules involve a lot of free time; they have more time to spend it together. My siblings and I can be considered very close companions. Although we do fight, I find it not as often as in comparison to my aunt’s three children. Since our schedules did not fill up with activities or team sports, we spent our time together talking and playing. I remember this Sunday afternoon, my siblings and I had finished our homework and with nothing to do, I decided to make a car out of cardboard. In a group effort we finished the car beautifully only to be thrown out into the dumpster in the end. Although the product was wasted, the development of the sibling relationship can be considered the most important. I believe close sibling relationships can help keep familial bonds close as children get older.

PIE paragraph

March 24th, 2010

Lisa Lu

Professor Steven Alvarez

English 110

24 March 2010

Girl like Me is a short featurette, about young African American girls who have a certain image imposed upon them by society. This featurette contains interviews by various young teenage high school African American girls; it also contains an experiment conducted to test how young an African American child is perceive certain images from the color of their skin. The director of the film intended the film to let people know why goes through the minds of these young girls when they are faced with the images of what a girl should look like and what they do look like. Many of these girls mention that beautiful is having light colored skin and having straight hair or relaxed hair.  The film then continues to mention how the Supreme Court case Brown vs. Board of Education (1954) conducted an experiment of how young African American children have internalized the importance of the color of their skin. The experiment was asking a series of young African American children to choose between two dolls of two colors one black one white. The results of the experiment, the majority of children chose the white doll. Kiki Davis , the director of A Girl like Me, decided to recreate that experiment proving that African American children still would choose the “white doll” . Pierre Bourdieu argues that certain forms of domination imposed by society can change a mind and belief. He writes

Because the economy of symbolic goods is based on belief, the principle of its reproduction or crisis is found in the reproduction or crisis of belief, that is, in continuity or rupture with the adjustment between mental structures (categories of perception and appreciation, systems of preference) and objective structures.(121-122)

This quote mentions how society “based of belief “ can change people opinions or minds ,“mental structures” ,through perception, appreciation or even by preference. In the featurette there is a similar problem with these teenage girls and children. How African Americans racially judge people of their own race just because their skin is darker is what director Kiki Davis wanted people to know. The images are forms of domination through which society pressures people to do ill-conceived things to their body. Ask any white person on the street what bleaching cream is they wouldn’t know. Ask an African American person what bleaching cream is and they will tell you that they use it. Teenage African American girls are pressured to bleach their skin because it will help them look more beautiful. They want to perm their hair straight because it will make them look less “African”. Even at a young age African American children have internalized these forms of domination onto themselves without knowing it. They draw themselves having lighter colored skin and playing with white dolls. It is through this “image” that young African Americans want to become so much like their white counterparts.

Citations:

Bourdieu, Pierre. “The Economy of Symbolic Goods.” Practical Reason: On the Theory of Action. Trans. Randal Johnson. Stanford: Stanford UP, 1998. Print.

Quiz Make Up

February 21st, 2010

Okay so I wasn’t there for the quiz. *sad* Anyways I hope I’m typing the right topic. >.>

So the question is how were you raised? concerted cultivation or natural growth. and im timing myself for 10 mins, writing about concerted cultivation and natural growth……starting now.

so my parents weren’t really there for me and my siblings. It happens that when it comes to parenting techniques I know my parents weren’t prepared to have me…i mean when i was one i was basically shipped off to Taiwan to live with my grandparents because my parents couldn’t raise me yet. so… i learned chinese there, preschool started at a young age in Taiwan. From what I remember and it isn’t so much, I was flying across two countries every 6 months. In a way, I think all my family members had a part in my up bringing.

my grandparents and aunts and uncles taught me how to walk, how to talk, how to eat. now fast forwarding to elementary school.when i started elementary school; my parents weren’t really there for me, i mean back then my parents owned a restaurant and they had a business to take care of and employees to manage, even after school, i went straight there because my parents couldn’t afford to send me to an after school. so i spend hours of my time doing homework and coloring and drawing and reading while my mom and dad whenever they had free time they would spend their precious time with me. My parent didn’t talk to me like an adult, they told me what to do, but I didn’t turn out to be stupid or a delinquent at least I don’t remember anything like that. I try to study hard because my parents worked hard and they didn’t want me to end up like them. So they always tell me Lisa, you have to work hard and go to college and try to achieve a better life than your parents. so i listened to them, i tried my best, and some times thats all you can hope for.

Educational Moment

February 21st, 2010

The most memorable education moment was probably my freshman year of high school. That year was the year I started to know how much studying and applying myself paid off. Before then I was they student who did homework when I felt like it and if it was too long then I wouldn’t do it. And I would get like B – to C+. But then when high school started, that was when I really started putting the effort to do well and really studying the material and listening in class and really focusing on my school work and not just goofing around. That year I really learned that hard work really does pay off. When my freshman year ended my GPA was a 3.5!! that was awesome, i was so surprised. So now I don’t think that genisus are geniuses because they just know it. Although it does have something to do with it some what…but now I know that you get there by hard work and perseverance and that should be how you handle life itself.

its been a while… chapter 1 of unequal childhoods.

February 11th, 2010

okay i usually update my blog every two times a week. honestly. its like my drug, i get a high off it. but ive been busy lately. thats not counting me being sick last week. really really horrible stomach virus. anyways, ive got a lot of catching up dont i? hmm.

okay we’re reading a new book in class called “unequal childhoods” by Annette Lareau. When I started reading it, let me tell you it beats reading my economics textbook. But its good book the author words it so that its still academically challenging, but you still know what shes talking about? get it? for me its a intermediate read, i mean there were a couple of words that i didn’t know…but that’s what my dictionary’s for. lol i knew there was some sort of difference between kids. i mean not all kids grow up to be alike. it really truely does depend on the resources the parents have. but thats not a big part of it, a big part of it has to do with the kids i feel. i cant wait to read further when i have time to see what other opnions lareau has about childrens upbringing.

btw….i have a huge problem with the end notes in the back…they are annoying and its bothersome to keep turning to the back of the book to see what she meant about one phrase. >.<

okay off to outline econ chapters

till next time

lilu

“training kids”???

February 2nd, 2010

okay just to start off, i would like to point out that the sound of training kids sounds like you’re training them for the army or something so…yea i would rather say raise kids.

i can honestly say raising kids are incredibly difficult. i mean i know my mom had an extremely difficult time raising my brother, my sister and me. shes always telling us that living is difficult and that we should do better in school to make more money to support ourselves…dont make the mistakes that she did. she tells us how much she had to sacrifice from her life for us. so raising kids is difficult.

i mean dont get me wrong, me and my siblings aren’t delinquents; we are really good kids who get decent grades in school. we are the kids that actually listen to mom. there is a phrase in chinese which literally translates to “listen to your mother’s words” that chinese philosophy was drilled into our heads. i mean, as being the oldest whenever my mom said lisa take care of your brother don’t let him wander. i wouldn’t let my brother out of my friggin sight.

the lessons ive learned from my childhood from both my mom and dad stood by me. but ultimately did not make me who i am. ive had other people influence my decision my grandparents my aunt my uncle my friends. so i wouldnt say that my parents really trained me. but the people in my lives did. life lessons that i learned while growing up. i grew up through experience and what my parents taught me. they realized that after the age if six hitting didnt really do me any good and for my siblings also.

i remember when my sister and i was suppose to walk my brother home. this guy was harassing us; my mom told us that if anyone did something like that just ignore them and walk a little faster. thats exactly what we did. and we got home safely.

to end off, its difficult to raise a kid. some would even say it might take a village to raise a kid. so dont laugh at single parents, they’ve got it tough.

until later,

lilu